Doors Open at Royal Columbian’s Mental Health, Substance-Use Centre

Doors Open at Royal Columbian’s Mental Health, Substance-Use Centre

The Royal Columbian Hospital has opened the doors to its mental health, substance-use centre. “The new Mental Health and Substance Use Wellness Centre is a wonderful healing space with 75 beds and several new and expanded outpatient clinics to support people on their healing journey” said Judy Darcy, Minister of Mental Health and Addictions.

Click the link to read the full story.

Doors open at Royal Columbians mental health substance-use centre

“For too long, children, youth and adults living with mental health and substance use challenges have struggled to get quick access to the supports they need and deserve,” said Judy Darcy, Minister of Mental Health and Addictions.

Schizophrenia Symptoms and Coping Tips

Schizophrenia Symptoms and Coping Tips

The HelpGuide discusses common misconceptions about schizophrenia as well as tips for coping. “While schizophrenia is a chronic disorder, many fears about the disorder are not based in reality. Most people with schizophrenia get better over time, not worse. Treatment options are improving all the time and there are plenty of things you can do to manage the disorder.”

Read the full article below.

Schizophrenia Symptoms and Coping Tips

Schizophrenia is a challenging brain disorder that often makes it difficult to distinguish between what is real and unreal, to think clearly, manage emotions, relate to others, and function normally. It affects the way a person behaves, thinks, and sees the world. The most common form is paranoid schizophrenia, or schizophrenia with paranoia, as it’s often called.

TEDEd What is Depression?

TEDEd What is Depression?

“Depression is the leading cause of disability in the world; in the United States, close to ten percent of adults struggle with the disease. But because it’s a mental illness, it can be a lot harder to understand than, say, high cholesterol. Helen M. Farrell examines the symptoms and treatments of depression, and gives some tips for how you might help a friend who is suffering.”

Watch the video below.

 

Family Finds Solace in ‘Real Life’ Atmosphere at Adrian House

Family Finds Solace in ‘Real Life’ Atmosphere at Adrian House

“It has been such a positive experience for my brother-in-law and our whole family,” says Julie (not her real name). Her brother-in-law has been a resident of Adrian House for six years. The facility is a duplex on a residential street, housing ten residents at a time.

Julie can’t say enough good things about the staff and progress her brother-in-law has made there. “They teach him to be independent,” she says. “That is something he could not do well at on his own.”

She explains that the combination of close supervision by mental workers and psychiatric nurses along with the routines of daily life is a recipe for success.

“He is cooking, cleaning and participating in group activities – he has a life,” says Julie. The resident’s extended family visits him regularly and feels good when they leave him at Adrian House. “The communication from the staff is very good, and we feel really comfortable and welcome,” she says.

Read more about Adrian House and its services.

Bell Let’s Talk, Ways You Can Help

When it comes to mental health, every action counts. Helping to end the stigma around mental illness can help create positive change.

It’s a fact: one in five people in Canada will experience a mental health issue or illness in any given year. One of the biggest hurdles for anyone suffering from mental illness is overcoming the stigma. It is the number one reason why two-thirds of those living with a mental illness do not seek help.

Developed in partnership with Dr. Heather Stuart, the Bell Canada Mental Health and Anti-stigma Research Chair at Queen’s University, here are 5 simple ways to help end the stigma that keeps too many who struggle with mental illness from seeking the help they need.

End the stigma | Bell Let’s Talk

It’s a fact: one in five people in Canada will experience a mental health issue or illness in any given year. One of the biggest hurdles for anyone suffering from mental illness is overcoming the stigma. It is the number one reason why two-thirds of those living with a mental illness do not seek help.

HelpGuide, Depression Symptoms and Warnings

“Feeling down from time to time is a normal part of life, but when emotions such as hopelessness and despair take hold and just won’t go away, you may have depression. More than just sadness in response to life’s struggles and setbacks, depression changes how you think, feel, and function in daily activities. It can interfere with your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and enjoy life. Just trying to get through the day can be overwhelming.”

Read more about depression symptoms & warnings below.

Depression Symptoms and Warning Signs

Feeling down from time to time is a normal part of life, but when emotions such as hopelessness and despair take hold and just won’t go away, you may have depression. More than just sadness in response to life’s struggles and setbacks, depression changes how you think, feel, and function in daily activities.

Easing Physical Symptoms of Anxiety

“You’ve had headaches on and off, or possibly nausea, or muscle pain. It could be emotions, rather than a physical illness, driving your symptoms.

Blame your autonomic nervous system. When you are under stress or anxious, this system kicks into action, and physical symptoms can appear — headaches, nausea, shortness of breath, shakiness, or stomach pain. “Doctors see it all the time — patients with real pain or other symptoms, but nothing is physically wrong with them,” says Dr. Arthur Barsky, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.”

Read more about the physical symptoms of anxiety below.

Recognizing and easing the physical symptoms of anxiety – Harvard Health

You’ve had headaches on and off, or possibly nausea, or muscle pain. It could be emotions, rather than a physical illness, driving your symptoms. Blame your autonomic nervous system. This is a system in your body that you don’t consciously control, but that regulates things like your heart rate, breathing, urination, and sexual function.

Family Extends their Heartfelt Thanks

Family Extends their Heartfelt Thanks

From the bottom of our hearts, we would like to express our profound gratitude for the comfort and care you and the staff showed Alex [not her real name] during her brief stay at Adrian House.

We were beyond thrilled with how well she was accepted into the Adrian House family, and although the transition was initially hard for her, we as a family watched her as she began to thrive like never before during the year she was living there. We saw a new twinkle in her eye as she spoke of going to eat Chinese food, taking a walk in different parks around Vancouver, going to Steveston, and various other places.

We were amazed with how quickly she began to call Adrian House her “home” and embraced communal living doing such things as creative cooking and playing crib with the other clients.

Both you and your staff did a wonderful job of taking care of her when she was healthy, and a truly amazing job of taking care of her when she was not well. The level of care and respect and professionalism you and your staff demonstrated when dealing with us as her family was so greatly appreciated.

You respected her for all her uniqueness as a person. You encouraged her to continue to try to better herself while also putting in place a wonderful safety net to catch her if she were to fall. We never saw her fall but only continue to improve under your careful watch.

We wish you and your staff nothing but the best.

Lonie, Ben, Jeremy, Meagan and Fiona

Meet Sandra Warren, Healthcare Worker at PCLA’s Adrian House

Meet Sandra Warren, Healthcare Worker at PCLA’s Adrian House

“I’ve been at this for 20 years, and I’m still passionate,” says Sandra Warren. The residents at PCLA “inspire me so much.” We recently had the chance to sit down with Sandra Warren, Mental Health Worker at Adrian House, and talk about her role, Adrian House and the future of mental healthcare in British Columbia.

After spending 10+ years working for Supported Independent Living (SIL), Sandra moved to PCLA earlier this year. At SIL, Sandra worked in the community to help find housing for people with mental illnesses. Speaking about the transition to PCLA, Sandra said switching to an agency that provides residential services was “very different and personal, because you’re in [residents’] lives every day.” Like many PCLA employees, the personal relationship developed with residents create memories that stick with us for a long time. Sandra spoke about an elderly resident who was struggling to find meaning in her life. Speaking with her, Sandra pointed out “you’re making meals and exercising. You still have an awful lot to give, and you bring me and the other residents a lot of joy.” Continuing, “she just gave me the biggest smile”.

Often in mental healthcare, we have to understand that “success” looks very different for each resident. Some days, success is getting out of bed in the morning, other days it will be making dinner. Employees like Sandra help our residents achieve their own definition of success every day.

Sandra also spoke about the important niche Adrian House plays in the mental health landscape of BC and what the future of mental healthcare looks like. “Adrian House is unique in that it is a safe environment for some of these residents who aren’t ready to transition to the community,” says Sandra. “There is no timeline for Adrian House … this is their home as long as residents need.”

With employees like Sandra on the frontlines, the future of PCLA is in good hands. PCLA truly could not be where it is today without the support and hard work of each and every employee, volunteer, donor and partners. From the bottom of our hearts, we say thank you for all that you do. Find more resources and blogs from PCLA here.

Wellness Champion Breanna Miller Helps Stó:Lō Youth Connect with their Strengths

“Breanna Miller is a mom, an auntie, and a Wellness Champion from Chi:yom First Nation. She’s giving back to her community through her work with youth across Stó:lō territory.”

Read more about Breanna Miller in this First Nations Health Authority article, link below.

Good Medicine: Wellness Champion Breanna Miller Helps Stó:Lō Youth Connect with their Strengths

​Breanna Miller is a mom, an auntie, and a Wellness Champion from Chi:yom First Nation. She’s giving back to her community through her work with youth across Stó:lō territory. Brean na has worked with youth from “day one” of her career, over 15 years ago, starting when she was in her second year of undergraduate studies.